OOP Fundamentals

There are many different takes on object oriented programming. I’ve saw this video of “Uncle Bob” latest week and I wanted to write a post about the fundamentals of OOP programming.

I like the way he explains OOP, interfaces, polymorphism and other related areas of object oriented methodology. So before starting with my post series of Symfony, I wanted to review a couple of basics, and how they are supposed to be used.

The benefits of working using OOP is that the application itself becames minimal, and the modules can be coded in independant pieces, that have a decoupled arquitecture and are independantly deployed, hence repairing a certain part does not brake the others. In Symfony this modules are called bundles. A good programming example, is the Symfony components itself, and another Business Logic example I’ve seen recently with independant Bundles is Elcodi.

HISTORY

The formal programming concept of objects was introduced in the 1960s in Simula 67, a major revision of Simula I, a programming language designed for discrete event simulation, created by Ole-Johan Dahl and Kristen Nygaard of the Norwegian Computing Center in Oslo.  Simula introduced the notion of classes and instances or objects (as well as subclasses, virtual methods, coroutines, and discrete event simulation) as part of an explicit programming paradigm.

DEFINITIONS. THE BIG 3

Encapsulation is the packing of data and functions into a single component. The features of encapsulation are supported using classes.

Inheritance is when an object or class is based on another object or class, using the same implementation or specifying implementation to maintain the same behavior (realizing an interface; inheriting behavior). It is a mechanism for code reuse and to allow independent extensions of the original software via public classes and interfaces. The relationships of objects or classes through inheritance give rise to a hierarchy.

Polymorphism is when source code dependancy is opposed to the source of control.

DOWNLOADABLES

Symfony2 Routing cheat sheet

Symfony2 Forms cheat sheet

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